Toxic Custard newsletter, transport

Desire lines: signs of bad design?

Desire lines are where authorities intend for people to go one way, but people (especially pedestrians) quite logically ignore them and go a different way. Often they indicate poor design. Here are some quick examples from my neck of the woods. You have to wonder whose bright idea this was. Try and divert the pedestrians away to a crossing. Why do it? The worn grass indicates not many people fo

Toxic Custard newsletter, walking

Here’s an idea: Pedestrian Clearways

For the proposals in City of Melbourne's discussion papers to be described as "radical" and "ridiculous" just shows how far we haven't come in transport planning in this state. Perhaps it's no surprise given that in the forthcoming election, if choosing a major party, we vote for either the mob who wants to build two massive motorways, or the mob who wants to build three massive motorways -- th

Toxic Custard newsletter, walking

Walking at night? Be one of the good guys

Lots of people usually alight at my station, even late at night. But as we all exit and walk off in different directions, the streets, especially at night, can get pretty quiet very fast. The awful murder of Eurydice Dixon has got us as a society once again talking about personal safety issues. While it's true the risks are actually greater at home among people we know, there are obviously s

Toxic Custard newsletter, walking

Bushes and trees blocking footpaths

We all like some greenery in our neighbourhoods. But as I noted in this rant blog post, one bane of pedestrians is bushes and trees overhanging footpaths. They're not really obvious unless you're walking, but bushes and trees like this are everywhere. I'm sick of having to duck out of their way. This is especially difficult when it's dark. You can easily not spot the hazard as you approac

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Brussels has zebra crossings. Lots and lots of zebra crossings. Could we have more too?

One of the things I found fascinating about Brussels on our recent holiday was - in contrast to Cardiff - how they've gone out of their way to make life easy for pedestrians. Most striking was that there were zebra crossings. Lots and lots of zebra crossings. When I first spotted how many there were, I wasn't totally sure what I was seeing, and actually warned my fellow travellers to wat

Toxic Custard newsletter, walking

Real estate agent signs – improving but some need more work

I've written before about blockages on footpaths: overhanging trees, motorcycles, cars and real estate agent advertising. There's at least been some pogress with real estate. It seems some agents, perhaps realising that blocking the footpath is illegal, have got newer, smaller flags. During my walk on Saturday morning, I spotted these: Buxton seem to have solved the problem. Their new sig

transport

Do your bit for walkability: keep the footpath clear

It wasn't planned this way, but this week's posts seem to have been all about pedestrians/walking. Along with rules about not parking over footpaths (and vehicles needing to give way to pedestrians when crossing footpaths), some people seem to be unaware that there are rules about keeping vegetation clear of footpaths. Able-bodied people can duck or brush past overhanging trees, or detou

Health, Toxic Custard newsletter

Steps to fitness

First, an update: FebFast is going well. A couple of minor transgressions, but overall given I've normally got a bit of a sweet tooth, I think I'm doing well avoiding junk food. Certainly no chips or chocolate have passed my lips since the start of the month, but perhaps more remarkably, no biscuits (despite the plentiful supply in the office) and no muesli bars. Thank you to those who have spo

Melbourne, transport

Some good stuff in the City of Melbourne’s Draft Walking Plan

You might have seen media coverage (Age / Herald Sun) of the new City of Melbourne Draft Walking Plan. There's lots of interesting stuff in the document (PDF, 35Mb). Below are some notes from a skim through. (Page references refer to those at the top of the page, eg numbered from the start of the PDF including cover sheets/intro, not the start of the document.) p1. The economic benefi