transport

Smartbus vs train: What’s faster for orbital travel?

One of the promises of the orbital Smartbus routes was to cater for crosstown travel. The Bracks Government's 2006 Meeting Our Transport Challenges document said this: The Government will invest $1.4 billion to create a crosstown transport network for Melbourne. Major new SmartBus routes, supported by improved local bus services, will connect with the rail network to create a grid of radial,

transport

Is the Smartbus branding dead? Why not make every bus a Smartbus?

Smartbus was devised in the dying days of the Kennett government originally as a mostly hardware-based upgrade: traffic priority, real-time information at stops, distinctive bus stop signs and buses. Originally it didn't include service upgrades (which sparked derision from the PTUA at the time), but this was changed early on during the Bracks government, with a trial on routes 703 and 888/889

transport

Smartbus signs – wouldn’t it be good if you could see them from the bus stop?

Having spent all that money on GPS in the buses, transmitters and receivers to get the bus locations onto electronic signs, wouldn't you think they'd think carefully about where those signs were located? Exhibit 1: Lonsdale Street, near Hardware Lane Exhibit 2: Dandenong Station (I've circled it in case it's not obvious) To be fair, most of those I've spotted are quite well located, s

transport

Why aren’t there more Smartbuses?

Why aren't there more Smartbuses? Smartbuses work. Smartbus is a fancy marketing name for buses that run more frequently than most other routes, have some bus priority and realtime electronic signs at major stops. The figures in this government press release show the upgrades of routes to Smartbus result in strong patronage growth. I've excluded the older 703 and 888/889 services from th