Bentleigh, Toxic Custard newsletter

Bentleigh: old real estate ads

I was looking on the State Library's web site for material related to my local suburb, and found these old real estate ads. This one is from back when Bentleigh was called East Brighton. It's dated 1885. It's the area immediately to the east of the railway station, which opened in 1881, and was renamed to Bentleigh in 1907, the year after the local post office was renamed. (Source: State Lib

Melbourne

Local history: North Road, SE9

Here's a little bit of history: an old street sign showing the pre-1967 UK-style Postal District Number: SE9. I'm quite amazed the sign has survived so long, unless perhaps it is a deliberate, heritage-based decision to keep and maintain it. The old codes don't seem to be in the first edition Melway, but I did find them in an older Collins street directory that I have. As with London pos

Melbourne, transport

1929 metropolitan plan: “the tramcar is the most efficient user of street space”

From page 54 (Chapter 2, part 1) of the 1929 Melbourne Plan for General Development, commissioned by the Metropolitan Town Planning Commission. Other highlights include Chapter 2, part 7, which has a bunch of stuff about railways, including a discussion of a railway to Doncaster (page 132) and a strong argument for a combined transport authority (page 143). Federal budget The budget l

transport

Rail project “characterised by costly mistakes”

This week's Regional Rail Link shutdown is not, of course, the first time major works have been done on the railways. The more things change, the more they stay the same. Fascinating stuff from The Argus, 17th October 1914: CAULFIELD RAILWAY. COSTLY DUPLICATION WORKS. ESTIMATE GREATLY EXCEEDED Provision has been made for the expenditure of £146,000 this year on the duplication and reg

Culture, transport

Happy birthday, Flinders Street Station

The current Flinders Street Station is 100 years old today. There's a newish book on the history of Flinders Street Station called Beyond the Facade by Jenny Davies. Recently I was walking through the Degraves Street subway and noticed a display for the book. Then something in one of the windows caught my eye; amongst the cartoons, a familiar logo: Below this was a copy o