Water taps

I’ve seen these water taps in hospitals and airports.

Water tap

It’s great that they’re provided, but the problem with them is you basically have to stick your head into the wall to get a drink out of them. So if you’re not very coordinated, you’ll probably bump it, as the space isn’t overly generous.

Surely they could provide just a little bit of space outwards — or upwards — to make it easier to use?

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5 Replies to “Water taps”

  1. It’s part of the Target 155 plan – to be seen to be supplying water bubblers but not ones anyone would actually want to use (tongue lodged in cheek).

  2. This is what I would call a drinking fountain. It is a poorly designed one. They seem to be very few in Australia such as the ones on the sidewalk in the CBD and some parks. In the US practically all public buildings and schools have them installed indoors usually outside the restrooms/toilets. Almost all of them have a small refrigerator built in to ensure the water nice and cold. The junior high school I attended (7th and 8th grades) had 2 fountains side by side and if 2 students were drinking at the same time one could release their button and send water shooting all over the other’s face due to the sudden increase in water pressure.

    I am actually surprised that they would not be more popular here in Australia especially seeing how hot and dry it can be here sometimes. If I am away from home and I want a drink of water I find myself having to pay $3 for a bottle of water instead of having a nice cool drink at a fountain for free like I would in the US.

    Halsey Taylor has the best drinking fountain design in my opinion with 2 converging water jets that make a nice, fat, and easy to drink from arc of cold water.

  3. The ones here at work are the same but have an additional spout to fill cups and bottles.

    The fact that it’s chilled seems to cover or remove the usual tap water after taste? Perhaps there is a filter in there somewhere?

  4. It’s probably so that visually impaired people relying on a cane to feel their way around don’t unintentionally get hit in the waist by a bubbler protruding from a wall.

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