Copy and paste

Spot the difference…

From the $5 million Eddington report (full version) page 84, section: “What other cities are doing” From urbanrail.net, a rail enthusiast web site run by Robert Schwandl
Shanghai (China) — The Shanghai metro is one of the youngest in the world and among the most rapidly expanding. The first line opened in 1995 as a northsouth axis from the Central Station to the southern suburbs; by the end of 2007, the network had reached a total length of 227 km, with 161 stations and 8 lines. www.urbanrail.net/as/shan/shanghai.htm

The Shanghai metro is one of the youngest in the world and among the most rapidly expanding. After the first line opened only in 1995 as a north-south axis from the Central Station to the southern suburbs, by the end of 2007 the network had reached a total length of 227 km, with 161 stations and 8 lines!

Madrid (Spain) — In 2007, the Madrid Metro became the second largest metro network in Europe after London (415 km). In 2006, the total length was 227 km with 236 stations (counted separately for each line), but with the completion of a major four-year expansion programme in spring of 2007 and another short extension, the total length of the network is now 284 km. www.urbanrail.net/eu/mad/madrid.htm

In 2007, the Madrid Metro has become the second largest metro network in Europe after London (415km). In 2006, the total length was 227 km with 236 stations (counted separately for each line), but with the completion of the 2003-2007 expansion programme in spring of 2007 and another short extension, the total length of the network is 284 km with 283 stations (07/2008).

Buenos Aires (Argentina) — is one of South America’s biggest cities with 3 million inhabitants (and 12 million in the larger metropolitan area). For a city of this size, the metro rail network is small, although it is by far the oldest subway in South America. After losing many passengers during the 1980s, the Subte was privatised and is now operated by Metrovias, which immediately started refurbishing stations and buying new rolling stock to replace older trains, some of which have been running since the Subte opened. The total network is now around 46.8 km in length and totally underground. www.urbanrail.net/am/buen/buenos-aires.htm

Buenos Aires, the capital of Argentina, is one of South America’s biggest cities with 3 million inhabitants (Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires) and 12 million in the larger metropolitan area (Gran Buenos Aires). For a city of this size the metro network is still very small although it’s by far the oldest subway in South America.

After losing many passengers during the 1980’s, the Subte was privatised and is now operated by Metrovias which immediately started refurbishing stations and buying new rolling stock to replace older
trains, some of which have been running since the Subte opened.

The total network is approx. 46.8 km (2007) and totally underground.

The problem here is all this text is replicated in the Eddington report without attribution or credit.

I reckon if a journo or a student tried that on, they’d rightfully get rapped over the knuckles.

(Apparently originally noted in Crikey yesterday; brought to my attention this morning.)

PS. Channel 10 graphics from tonight’s 5pm news:
Eddington report

PPS. Wednesday’s Age.

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12 Replies to “Copy and paste”

  1. Sir Rod is not a planner. He is supported by Connex (god knows why…). He contradicts his own report. His GHG emission reduction plan is based on false hopes about green cars. He thinks oil in infinite.
    In other words, what more would you expect?

  2. If a student was caught doing this on an assesment piece by the anti-plagarism software where I teach they could be failed, referred to a disciplinary committee and/or refused the faculty character reference needed to enter the UK legal profession.

  3. Andrew, it was on Channel 10 tonight, and is expected in The Age tomorrow morning.

    Doug, interesting! Does the proportion of copied work matter? This is about 200 words out of a report several hundred pages long. (Mind you, we don’t know if other text in the report has been lifted from anywhere in the same way.)

  4. And they get paid how many million of public money to research this?

    Makes one wonder how many shortcuts might have been taken in more important parts of the report.

    Rod’s been an airline guy for a long while – Cathay and BA.

  5. And Brumby paid this moron $5 million. Geez Sir? He is totally ignorant that local residents do not want a road tunnel! I like the idea of the metro but there are bigger priorities in many books

  6. A few quotation marks and a footnote or two would make this copying legit and the writer look a little lazy. Copying this easily available information without notation realy makes this person a fool. In the high school and university I attended this would be blatent plagerism and would result in failure if not expulsion from the school. I wrote many a termpaper and it is really not too hard to quote and put information into your own words.

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