Pics from last week

You can tell I don’t have a good blog post ready to go when I post a bunch of pictures. Here’s a few from last week (that you may have seen if you follow me on Twitter).

Mer Chri! — This was on Thursday night — by Friday they’d put up the other letters. Below the picture they’d put in supports earlier in the week — you can see the full set in this picture from last year. They must keep all the letters in a depot somewhere for the rest of the year.
Mer Chri!

Preparing to bring Thursday night’s train chaos into your livingroom — this is Andrew Lund from Channel 9, wired-up and about to report live from Flinders Street Station
It's @andrew_lund hard at work, bringing tonight's chaos to you at home.

The robots are coming! — Alan Kohler always likes a one-liner in his financial graphs.
Eek! @AlanKohler says the robots are coming!

Jack’s having a rest — Jack knows in an open paddock, sometimes the only shade is underneath the ute. Meanwhile, I had to continually pick grass seeds off my socks.
Jack

News-junkies’ summary of TV news bulletins

I was thinking that for news junkies like me, it’d be nice to have a quick reference to when it’s possible to tune into a news bulletin on free-to-air television. With ABC News 24, this is easier than ever before, but in fact there are numerous times when other channels air substantial (10+ minutes) bulletins when ABC News 24 is showing other things, such as The Drum.

I’ve included shows like Today, Lateline and Afternoon Live which include a regular news bulletin, even though some of these are probably shorter than 10 minutes long. I’ve excluded non-Australian bulletins, such as the BBC News shown overnight on ABC News 24.

The symbols used below are:

* State-based news (all others are national)
+ Time varies
# Live webcast available

Weekdays:

Summary of TV news bulletins: Weekdays

Saturdays:

Summary of TV news bulletins: Saturdays

Sundays:

Summary of TV news bulletins: Sundays

See any errors? Let me know.

Osama bin Laden

Osama bin Laden is a good example of a moral issue that for me is more grey than black and white.

I would like to think that I would never wish anybody dead, nor be glad at hearing of someone’s demise.

But if ever I were to waver on that, it would be for someone who caused the deaths of thousands of people.

There are questions over the operation of course. At first they seemed to be claiming that he was armed, and used a woman as a human shield. Now they’re saying he was unarmed… but reaching for a gun?

The compound was described in some reports as a “mansion”. Gotta say it doesn’t look much like a mansion to me.

The future

I think we all know it doesn’t mean the end for al-Qaeda of course, nor for global terrorism.

But as some commentators have said, perhaps other events are overtaking them. Perhaps we can hope that the democracy movement and protests in Egypt and elsewhere will continue to spread, bringing change to the Middle East that makes extremists obsolete and/or marginalised, as most of them are in democracies around the world?

MX

Have to pity MX. The biggest story of the week, and it was breaking just as they were going to press. Normally they have their stories written by midday, but this was emerging at about 12:30pm, and wasn’t confirmed until about an hour later.

Credit to them though; they managed to re-do their front page (though I saw some copies without the OBL story). However they obviously got the page done before the detail was confirmed, as it referred to bin Laden’s death being a week earlier, using a bomb, citing Fox News’s “multiple sources”.

MX: bin Laden dead

Whoops. I suppose in that situation you just have to do what you can.

Japan’s disaster (or as ACA put it: “Catastrophe!”)

The trilogy of disasters: earthquake, tsunami and nuclear emergency, bringing untold misery and tragedy to the people of Japan — and what does ACA do? They use a caption which makes it sound like it’s a scene from a musical.

A Current Affair's caption for the Japan earthquake/tsunami/nuclear disaster

It was clear from the time the first videos were shown on Friday afternoon that this was serious. And perhaps the fact that it’s happened in a technologically advanced country (as well as one with relatively close ties to Australia) makes the impact all the more powerful — with saturation media coverage not seen for some other recent disasters. (Cyclone Nargis, anybody?)

I suppose it’s the nuclear aspect that has really focussed people’s attention. We’re a long way away, but it’s scary stuff — and it’s unclear what will happen next.

One can only hope they bring it under control as quickly as possible so the recovery and rebuilding can proceed quickly.

Red Cross Australia appeal