General Motors: “Stop pedaling, start driving” vs Giant Bicycles’ comeback

General Motors’ campaign in US college newspapers:

GM's "Stop pedaling, start driving" campaign

(via Bike Portland)

Seems to be implying that driving is cooler than cycling. Pretty funny… to a lot of the younger generation (including Americans, at least in cities like Portland), there’s nothing cool about driving a huge truck.

Anyway, here’s Giant Bicycles’ comeback:

Giant Bicycles, comeback to GM "Stop pedaling" campaign

(via Justin Haugens)

GM have apparently now pulled the ad.

Bike helmets

Radio National’s Background Briefing had a feature story on the bike helmet debate yesterday morning. You can download it and listen to it here.

It talks about Melbourne’s bike share scheme; the experience in Europe (where cyclist numbers are higher, but injuries are lower) vs Australia (which it sounds like is the only country with compulsory bike helmet laws, since 1990, and is now cited in Europe has how not to do things); what really makes cyclists safe (investment in separate bike paths and lanes); the changing attitudes to road investment in European cities (concentrating on cars in the 50s, but switching back to cyclists and pedestrians in the 70s and ever since); and the ego and antagonism from both cyclists and motorists.

My conclusion:

On an individual level, your risk of injury is undoubtedly lessened by wearing a helmet. (One of the medical experts said you’re four times less likely to incur head injuries.)

But on a communal level, it’s quite possible that society might well be better off by not having compulsory helmet laws — because they discourage people, and in cycling, safety comes in numbers — and instead concentrating on more bike lanes and bike paths, as they have in the most successful cycling cities in Europe.

(Certainly for me the concern about sharing space with cars and trucks is my biggest worry about cycling.)

In turn, cities with less people cycling means less overall health benefit from active transport, so a less healthy society overall.

One contributor to the programme suggested that a study needs to be conducted, which could involve one state repealing (at least temporarily) its helmet laws, to see what happens.

The walk to the station is doing you good

Seems some people can’t see the trees for the forest.

A HIGH school has banned bicycles because it has no bike shed and it doesn’t want to encourage students who refuse to wear helmets.

Hume Central Secondary College’s policy has puzzled health and cycling groups amid growing concern about childhood obesity.

In the same newsletter, she [Principal Bronwyn Meek] complained about the dangerous congestion caused by too many cars around afternoon pick-up time.

– Herald Sun: Hume Central Secondary College bans bikes

Meanwhile, a study by BusVic concluded that users of public transport get an average five times more walking time per day than those who use private transport.

  • Public transport (all users): 41 mins
  • Public transport, no private transport: 47 mins
  • Private transport (cars, taxis, motorcycles), but no public transport: 8 mins
  • Overall Melbourne average: 15 mins

And they looked at which areas of Melbourne have the lowest average minutes per day walking and cycling. Hardly surprising that it’s the areas which have the poorest public transport, where people are dependent on their cars for most trips.

Melbourne active transport

And people wonder why there’s an obesity crisis.

I may not always enjoy the walk to the station, but I know it’s good for me, and because it’s built into my daily routine, it always happens.

I’m just lucky I live in an area where I’ve got that choice.