Aussie Sportball finals time!

You can tell it’s footy finals time — this rather impressive tribute of sugary drinks was at the Oakleigh South Safeway Woolies this week.

Spotted at South Oakleigh Woolies: grocery tribute to Aussie Rules sportball

Somehow I’ve won the tipping in Tony’s competition for the second year in a row.

I think this might mean I get to present the perpetual trophy to myself.

PS. The term “sportball” is a mildly mocking word for organised sport, in particular football — less derisive than “footbrawl”. I note in Canada it’s an actual sport aimed at children.

Nagambie’s new life-size statue of Black Caviar

On the way up to Rutherglen for the wedding, we detoured past Nagambie on family business and to stop for lunch.

Nagambie’s bypass opened earlier this year. Traffic between Melbourne and Shepparton therefore no longer goes via the town, and it’s obvious that they’ve been trying to work out how to ensure some people still come through and patronise local businesses.

Their answer? Black Caviar!

The undefeated champion horse was born in Nagambie in 2006, and for some time now there have been signs up on the highway approach into town proclaiming this. But last Thursday they went one better, unveiling a lifesize statue of the mare, in a prominent position on the main street, by the lake.

Black Caviar statue, Nagambie

As you can see, it’s an impressive piece of work, with a lot of detail.

Its spot by the lake is handily located right next to the V/Line bus stop, also used by private buses from Melbourne airport. (V/Line trains also serve Nagambie a few times a day; the station is a few hundred metres away. The V/Line buses help fill gaps between trains in the timetable.)

Black Caviar statue, Nagambie

When we stopped past on Friday, so were others. There was a light but steady stream of people coming past, taking photos, reading the plaques.

Each side of the pedestal the statue is on has a plaque, and each has different information about the horse. This one is down the back end:

Black Caviar statue, Nagambie

It appears special solar-powered CCTV has been installed to protect the statue:

Black Caviar statue CCTV

Around the town, there were still balloons and signs up, and some businesses had Black Caviar specials for the week.

Nagambie: Black Caviar colours around town

(One for the gunzels: a picture in a nearby noticeboard of a diesel engine in Black Caviar colours.)

What the national media might have missed when covering the story on Thursday was the controversy around the location of the statue.

Angry residents gathered at Nagambie yesterday vowing to fight the decision to put up a statue of super horse Black Caviar on the site of the former Chapel of the Lake.

The church, built in 1885, was destroyed in 2003 when a truck crashed through the middle of it.

Where the church stood, bricks from the original building have been formed into a cross and a small display explains the history of the site.

Shepparton News 22/6/2013: Black Caviar statue fury

One family member who is a local couldn’t figure out why the Black Caviar statue wasn’t placed further along, leaving the church memorial in place. It’s not like Black Caviar had a specific link to that exact spot by the lake.

Oh well, if you’re driving past Nagambie and fancy getting off the freeway, or are coming past in a V/Line bus, check out the statue.

(Note for geeks: Black Caviar is, of course, not to be confused with Caviar Black hard drives, now known as Western Digital Black.)

Last night’s AFL match result – nowhere to be found in The Age paper edition?

I get The Age delivered on weekends. On Saturdays in particular it’s good to lazily read its numerous sections in the morning.

So I picked it up wanting to know who won the football last night: Richmond or Fremantle? I just want to know if I tipped it right.

Sometimes they have the score on the front page. Not this time.
The Age front cover 27/4/2013

OK, so I flick to the Sports section. Not on the cover of that either.
IMAG0639

Then I flick through the entire Sports section (not something I do very often, I confess) looking for an answer. It’s not there. Any number of other football-related articles, but not the result of last night’s game.

It seems that while the printed version that landed on my doorstep sometime around 6am doesn’t have it, a later edition (including the Digital Edition) does have it, on page 4.
Age Sports section cover, later edition 27/4/2013

Now, I know the game was in Perth, so would have been a couple of hours behind a Melbourne Friday night game. But it was three-quarter time when I went to bed around 11pm last night, so surely they could have got a result into the paper to be delivered about 7 hours later?

I eventually went back to the Footy Tips web site to find it. I correctly tipped Freo.

And they wonder why the mainstream media is in trouble.

Was it in the Herald Sun delivered to homes?

Olympics opening ceremony – I liked it

I’m not normally one who really watches the Olympics, but I really enjoyed the opening ceremony of the London games.

Not the athletes parade of course; apart from the quite inspiring presence of some of the really troubled countries like Sudan and Afghanistan and Sierra Leone, I’m sorry, but I find it a real yawnfest.

But the rest of the ceremony I thought was great. I’m sure this is a consequence of being half-English myself — and therefore perhaps immersed in British culture than most Australians — I got a lump in the throat when I saw Danny Boyle’s tributes to the UK culture.

London 2012 opening: Tim Berners-Lee's message
Source: The Telegraph

In fact I liked it from the opening montage at the very start — with lots of little references to popular music, London landmarks, the London Underground (with a blast of The Clash), even EastEnders was in there. The imagery of England’s “green and pleasant land” along with the singing of Jerusalem took me back to singing the song in high school (and let me tell you, massed singing does something to it that is indescribable.)

I liked that it showed both the good and the bad of the development of modern Britain — the genius of Brunel, but also the pollution and upheaval of the industrial revolution; the inequality that spawned the suffragette movement; the loss of war.

The insertion of Mr Bean into Chariots Of Fire was very funny, as was the Queen’s bit with James Bond, and it was great to see Sir Tim Berners-Lee — even if the American NBC commentators didn’t know who he was, and suggested Googling him…

I had to laugh at the National Health Service tribute, having heard my sister and cousin speak of the difficulties of dealing with the NHS bureaucracy, and I wonder what conservative Americans thought of it. It was also funny to see one bed in that segment with two kids in it — hopefully not generally reflective of the state of British hospitals.

So in summary, I suppose I fall into the camp that thinks Danny Boyle is a genius.

Not everybody liked it; UK Conservative MP Aiden Burley tweeted:

The most leftie opening ceremony I have ever seen – more than Beijing, the capital of a communist state! Welfare tribute next?

What a plonker.