My verdict on the Tintin movie

Look! It’s Tintin on a bus…
Tintin on a bus

And here’s Tintin on a tram (and a tram in Tintin)…
Tintin on a tram / a tram in Tintin

So anyway, we went to the Tintin movie yesterday — in 2D, as 3D doesn’t work on me. I enjoyed it a lot. They did a good job of recreating the look of Herge, and there were plenty of references to keep Tintin nerds like me entertained.

The first half of the movie had a lot of bits of Tintin stories all mushed together, and it was a bit like watching a rock concert, recognising the start of a scene, but being keen to see how they used the material.

[Limited spoilers ahead]
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Can you name the man on the couch?

…and if so, how many seconds did it take you?

Update 8pm: Yes, many guessed, some didn’t.

I came across it when I was at home on Monday. Unfortunately I didn’t stay tuned… apart from George Cole (better known as Arthur Daley), Sid James and Joan Sims, there was another familiar face somewhere in there, a one-time associate of the above gentleman.

A few pics: Myer, trams, crocs and Star Wars

I don’t have a proper blog post for you, so here’s a few pictures from the last week or so.

If you were looking for Myer’s Lonsdale Street store, it’s gone — almost all of it except the facade.
Myer Lonsdale Street
(When I was a kid, we often went into the City on a Friday night, had dinner at the Coles cafeteria in Bourke Street, then made our way up through the back of Myer to level 6, where the toy department was, before heading to Lonsdale Street to catch the 602 bus home.)

Great to see Yarra Trams continuing its removal of mystery “phantom” route numbers. This “67a” (that’s “a” for altered) was diverted during the Queen’s visit.
Tram 67a

Southland: Beware of crocs.
Warning! Crocs!

Darth Maul in a playful mood at EB Games, Southland.
Star Wars

Grainy vs smooth

From the popup text of the comic reproduced below:

We’re also stuck with blurry, juddery, slow-panning 24fps movies forever because (thanks to 60fps home video) people associate high framerates with camcorders and cheap sitcoms, and thus think good framerates look ‘fake’.

The first DVD I played on my old Loewe TV when I got it (in June 2002, though staggeringly I appear not to have blogged about it) was scene two of O Brother, Where Art Thou — where our three heroes try and jump aboard a freight train.

I dug it out to try the DVD player with the new TV, the other day.

With the ol’ Pioneer DV-344 and component cables (actually just repurposed RCA cables), the picture is amazingly clear, and the film incredibly smooth. So much so that, as per the comment above, it does look like it was shot on cheap video — in fact it reminds me a little of old programmes from the 60s shot on video.

I assume that a combination of the component cables, plus the TV refreshing at 100 Hz is doing it.

I’m far more used to material being shot on film looking a teensy bit grainy, but I suspect I’ll get used to it.

PS. Even the TV reception looks better than it did in the shop. Not sure what the deal is there… though in real life we view the screen from further away than it is in the shop.

Tron (and why home theatre is so popular)

I don’t see a lot of movies in the cinema, so call me slow if you like, but I think I’ve worked out why big TVs and DVDs and Bluray are getting so popular.

Cinema tickets

Freaking $18.50 for an adult, $13.50 for kids? (And this is at 10am on a weekday — I don’t know if their pricing varies at peak times.) Plus $4 each for Choc Tops, and $3.90 for a bottle of water. $61.40 for a movie with a snack? Gordon Bennett.

The silver-lining is there was only one other person in the theatre, sitting right up the back, so we got pick of the seats.

And the movie itself? Spectacular, but not deep. Enjoyable but not utterly brilliant. A little like the original, in fact.