Belt up: Stockade Leather

A shout-out to a good shop which doesn’t have a web site of its own:

About once every decade I buy a belt.

They last that long — I get them from a place in Elsternwick called Stockdale Stockade Leather (552 Glen Huntly Road), which I’m amazed is still in business because their stuff is so resilient — they must get a lot of repeat business.

Stockade Leather, Elsternwick

It looks rather like their belts are made in the shop — the front section is where they’re displayed, and further back it looks more like a workshop than a shop.

I went in today for a couple of belts. I don’t remember how much they cost last time, but now they’re $45, which is not unreasonable for quality that lasts. Another customer was in there praising their belts too.

I hope they’re still around in a decade when I need another.

Update 31/8/2014: I’ve somehow been getting this shop’s name wrong for years, thinking it was Stockdale not Stockade… and therefore not finding its web site. It does have one.

The umbrella wrapper

This is near the entrance to one of the local supermarkets.

I understand what it is — it wraps your umbrella in plastic — I just don’t understand why such a thing is needed.

Umbrella wrapper

While it’s nice to see them catering for pedestrians (since I’d assume few people coming from a parked car would bother with an umbrella), I have yet to see anybody actually use it.

Seems to me if you arrive with a wet umbrella, shaking it out before you come in is a better way of dealing with it. The dispenser is only at one of the two entrances in any case.

In fact, in a place where plastic bags are plentiful, I would have thought anybody arriving with an umbrella that they felt was so wet they had to wrap it up, would have had plenty of options without a special dispenser having to be provided.

Maybe I’m missing something.

Are shop receipts getting longer?

Is it just me, or are shop receipts getting longer?

Yesterday in Target I bought two items (I’ve blurred the details because one is a gift for someone).

The receipt was longer than my arm.

Target receipt

On the bright side, on the back are about a dozen different Shop-a-docket offers.

JB Hifi – hope they don’t go the way of Dick Smith

I always thought it was the beginning of the end for Dick Smith Electronics when they stopped selling… well, electronics, and got into consumer goods like kettles and fridges.

Now JB Hifi might be going the same way, with their JB Hifi Home operation, which has moved into some of their stores, and sells stuff online.
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Spot the difference – transport advertising in the lead-up to elections

I was thinking the government ads about transport upgrades back in 2009-10 (Labor) are pretty similar to 2014 (Coalition).

How would it be if I got them both and dubbed the audio of one over the video of another?

The 2010 version is mostly about trains; the 2014 one has been chopped a tad to remove around 15 seconds that was about East West Link. But it’s surprising how well they fit. (The full unedited versions are shown below.)

This time around, Channel 7 reports ads like this have cost at least $3.2 million so far.

Comparing 2010 to 2014

Let’s play a little game of Spot The Difference.

2009-2010 – Labor 2013-2014 – Coalition
Advert for new Smartbus route 903
Advert for a measly 6 extra services on bus route 630
moving-victoria-ad-20140301
Nice placement: Advertising, Cheltenham station
Victorian Transport Plan advertising, December 2009
Myki billboard advertising, February 2014
Bayside Rail Imorovements poster, Bentleigh, February 2014 (cropped)
Opposition transport spokesman Terry Mulder said the ad campaign should now be considered “electioneering” and withdrawn immediately. He vowed to cut advertising spending in the transport portfolio if the Coalition won government in November. “If I’m the transport minister, the money I have available to me will be going into nuts and bolts business, not self-promotion,” he said.

The Age, 1/9/2010

Rather than invest in public transport Napthine Govt invests in advertising 2 tell us how good it is. But you can’t spin lived experience!
Jill Hennessy, Labor Public Transport Spokesperson, 28/2/2014, Twitter

Denis Napthine will fight for his survival with the last dollar of your money #springst
Martin Pakula, Labor Spokesperson for Scrutiny of Government, and Transport Minister 2010, 1/3/2014, Twitter


Is advertising ever justified?

Yes, sure it is. Public transport is a product which competes against other modes of travel, particularly cars.

But it the ads should be informative, or at the very least should tell you why (even at a high level) you should be using the product.

Some of the ads have been informative at some level. From the sample above (and it is only a sample), Labor’s newspaper ads and the Coalition’s billboard/noticeboard ads have some level of useful information in them.

Amazingly, none of the Coalition’s ads spell out a huge improvement they’ve delivered in the last couple of years, but almost totally failed to promote: frequent weekend trains on much of the network.

And the TV ads in particular, placed by both sides of politics over the years, tell you very little — they seem purely design to try and convince you that your Government is doing Good Things with your money.

Update 13/8/2014: The video mashup features in this Age story today: State transport ad campaign costs mount

It’s worth noting that from comparing these ads, while the current Coalition campaign promotes a lot of projects that are years away from completion (and in some cases haven’t been fully funded yet), most of the Labor campaign from 2010 focussed on projects which were then at the delivery stage, or at least were fully funded.